What Aquarium Fish Eat Snails? (List of 12 You Will Need)

What Aquarium Fish Eat Snails?

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What aquarium fish eat snails? Fish are a great addition to an aquarium. They can be used to help keep the tank clean, and they add color and life to your home. But not all fish are aquatic!

Once in awhile, you may find yourself with a landlubber who loves the water more than anything else in the world—except maybe food!

These “aquatic” fish will spend all their time swimming around your tank, looking for yummy things to eat. If one of these finicky feeders is living in your aquarium, it might be time for some snail control!

One of the most popular questions people have asked is, “What aquarium fish eat snails?” Snails are one of those unsung heroes that keep the aquarium clean without getting any recognition.

It’s actually quite sad when you think about it, so I’m going to talk about some of the more common tankmates and what they like to eat in their spare time.

Moreover, it can be difficult to find a tankmate for your fancy goldfish or angelfish because they’re picky eaters and aren’t interested in a lot of other fish food.

What aquarium fish eat snails?

You may have heard that snails are easy to breed, and they’re often seen as perfect “beginner” pets. However, not all aquarium fish eat snails. Some fish will happily gobble them up, but others will ignore them or even attack you for bringing a snail into their home!

There are many different species of snails available for purchase in pet stores or online. Some common types include ramshorn snails (Planorbella trivolvis) and nerite snails (Nerita sp.). A wide array of other kinds exist; here are some examples:

  • Apple snail (Pomacea maculata)
  • African dwarf frog snail (Pseudemys nelsoni)
  • Mystery snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis)

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List of aquarium fish that eat snails

  1. Yoyo Loach
  2. Raphael Catfish with Stripes
  3. Clown Loach
  4. Gourami
  5. Dwarf Chain Loach
  6. Bala Shark
  7. Zebra Loach
  8. Cory Catfish
  9. Goldfish
  10. Puffer with Green Spots
  11. Betta Fish
  12. Assassin Snail

1. Yoyo Loach

This freshwater fish, native to Asia and India, is commonly kept in community aquariums because it’s easy to care for and does well with other peaceful fish.

Yoyos are omnivorous, which means that they eat meaty foods like snails, worms, and small insects, but they’re also happy to feast on vegetables such as algae or sinking pellets.

They have an elongated body that can grow up to 4 inches long! Yoyos live up to 10 years, so make sure you have room in your tank if you want a long-term pet.

Yoyos are a popular freshwater aquarium fish and can make great pets. They’re peaceful and easy to care for, so they’re a great choice for beginner aquarists or those who want a low-maintenance pet.

Yoyos are omnivores and eat both meaty foods like snails, worms, and small insects, but they’re also happy to feast on vegetables such as algae or sinking pellets.

They have an elongated body that can grow up to 4 inches long! Yoyos live up to 10 years, so make sure you have room in your tank if you want a long-term pet.

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2. Striped Raphael Catfish

The Striped Raphael Catfish is a bottom feeder, scavenger, and bottom dweller that can be found in the aquarium trade. The striped raphael catfish is also a predator, hunter, and opportunistic feeder.

Striped Raphael Catfish are very similar in appearance to Cherry Shrimps; however, there are some distinct differences between the two species:

The stripes on the body of the Striped Raphael Catfish run horizontally along its sides, while those on cherry shrimp run vertically down their backs.

There are no stripes visible on cherry shrimps’ undersides (whereas these are clearly marked with black bars).

The stripes on the Striped Raphael Catfish are thin and narrow, whereas those on cherry shrimp are thicker and wider. The striped raphael catfish has a broader head than cherry shrimp.

The striped raphael catfish has a fatter, rounder body than cherry shrimp. The striped raphael catfish has a smaller mouth.

Whereas the mouths of cherry shrimp are very large and often triangular-shaped, the Striped Raphael Catfish’s eyes are larger than those of cherry shrimp.

3. Clown Loach

The clown loach is a freshwater fish belonging to the family Anabantidae. It has a large mouth and a big appetite; it eats snails, worms, and small fish. Clown loaches are not aggressive towards other fish in the aquarium.

However, they do require ample swimming space because they can grow up to 12 inches (30 cm) in length. Clown loaches are one of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish and can be found in almost every pet store.

They are easy to care for, hardy, and inexpensive. Clown loaches need at least a 20-gallon tank with plenty of hiding places because they can be shy at first.

The clown loach is one of the hardiest aquarium fish and can be kept in a community tank. They are peaceful and will get along with most other fish, except those with long, sharp fins like swordtails or barbs.

The clown loach likes to burrow under rocks and driftwood, so it needs plenty of hiding places.

The clown loach is commonly mistaken for the freshwater catfish, and it may be sold under this name as well. Both species have a similar shape, but catfish have barbs around their mouths.

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4. Gourami

Gourami, or gouramies, are a group of freshwater fish native to India. They can grow up to about five inches long and have a slender build with dark stripes along the sides of their bodies.

Gouramis are popular aquarium fish due to their bright colors and peaceful nature. They make great community aquarium fish because they get along well with other species that aren’t aggressive toward them.

Aquarists should keep in mind that gouramis require special care because they are one of the largest living fishes in existence—the female can lay as many as 300 eggs at once!

If you want to own these beautiful creatures, then keep reading for more information on what they eat, how long they live, etc.

Gouramis are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods. They can be fed a combination of flakes and freeze-dried bloodworms, as well as live worms or brine shrimp.

It’s important to keep in mind that these fish get larger over time, so you should make sure they have plenty of space in the aquarium.

5. Dwarf Chain Loach

The dwarf chain loach is a small fish that grows to about 3 inches long. This fish is a bottom dweller and eats snails, small insects, and other foods that are found on the bottom of your aquarium.

The Dwarf Chain Loach is an easy-to-care-for peaceful fish; however, it can become aggressive if kept in large numbers or with other aggressive tankmates, such as cichlids or tetras.

The Dwarf Chain Loach has been known to eat snails in the wild, so it is best to keep them in an aquarium on their own or with other dwarf chain loaches to keep them company.

The dwarf chain loach is a fun fish to have in your aquarium. It also makes an easy choice for a beginner because of its peaceful nature and hardy disposition.

The dwarf chain loach has a lifespan of about 5 years. It is important to keep the water quality high, especially if you are keeping more than one fish in an aquarium. You should provide your fish with lots of hiding places and driftwood for them to explore.

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6. Bala Shark

Bala sharks are omnivores, meaning they will eat both plants and animals. This makes them an excellent choice for a community tank because they will clean up algae, consume leftover food, and even help keep your tank clear of snails.

These fish are very active and can grow up to 10 inches long! Because they are so large, it’s best to keep them in a large aquarium with plenty of hiding places (such as rocks or driftwood).

Bala sharks aren’t picky about their diet—they will eat just about anything you give them. They do best on a varied diet made up of frozen foods like brine shrimp and daphnia, but they also enjoy pellets that contain spirulina algae.

You should provide your Bala shark with enough variety so that it has something to eat at all times! Bala sharks are very easy to care for.

They do not require any special equipment or water conditions; they can thrive in any freshwater aquarium! These fish need a large tank that’s at least 30 gallons and contains plenty of hiding places (such as rocks or driftwood).

7. Zebra Loach

A zebra loach is a freshwater fish that feeds on algae and small invertebrates, such as worms and insect larvae. It is an omnivore, so it eats both plants and animals in its aquarium environment.

The zebra loach is also a bottom feeder with sharp teeth that help it process the food it eats.

It plays an important role in cleaning up debris from the bottom of your aquarium tank by eating leftover fish food, waste products from dead animals, or leftover plant matter you have removed from your tank’s substrate (the floor of your aquarium).

The omnivore nature of this species means it can survive only when there are other fish around to clean up after them, so make sure there are some other scavengers or filter feeders in your home before adding one to your setup!

This is one of the reasons why it’s important to choose your fish carefully. Not all species are compatible with one another, so make sure you research what kinds of fish can live together before buying them all at once.

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8. Cory Catfish

Cory catfish are omnivorous and will eat snails. They are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks and make good tankmates for most other fish.

They will eat most types of algae, but they also need a small amount of live food, such as mosquito larvae or brine shrimp, occasionally to stay healthy.

The key to keeping cory catfish healthy and happy is to provide them with a well-filtered tank that has plenty of hiding places and plants. They prefer temperatures between 65 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here are the most common cory catfish diseases and how to treat them:

Fin Rot: This is caused by poor water quality and can be treated by performing a 10% water change every day for two weeks. The fish will also need an antibacterial treatment as well as a salt bath.

Fungus/Black Spot Disease: This can be treated with an antifungal drug, but it’s best to keep the water clean to keep it from happening in the first place.

White Spot Disease: This is caused by a parasite that attaches itself to the fish and can be treated with an antiparasitic medication.

Hole in the Head Disease: Caused by poor diet and stress, this condition can be treated with an antibiotic.

9. Goldfish

Goldfish are omnivores, meaning they will eat both plants and animals. They can be kept in large aquariums that give them plenty of room to swim around. Goldfish are relatively easy to care for.

Goldfish should be fed a diet consisting of freeze-dried bloodworms, brine shrimp, tubifex worms, and earthworms on a regular basis. They also enjoy frozen krill and brine shrimp, which you can add as treats.

Goldfish need a large aquarium with plenty of swimming room. They should also be kept in water that has been treated with aquarium salt to prevent disease and help keep water quality high.

The aquarium should be cleaned at least once a week. You can do this by vacuuming the gravel and removing any dead fish as well as any uneaten food.

Goldfish can live for up to 10 years, but they are best kept in tanks that are at least 20 gallons. If you want them to live a long time, you should keep them in an environment with very little stress and change.

If you intend to keep a goldfish for a long time, make sure it has plenty of space in its tank.

A good rule of thumb is that one inch of fish should be provided for every gallon of water. Goldfish also need plenty of oxygen in their water, so add an aquarium filter to keep aquarium water clean and circulating.

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10. Green-Spotted Puffer

The Green Spotted Puffer is a freshwater fish that can be kept in an aquarium and is a good choice for beginners. The species does best when kept with other fish in large groups, so if you plan on keeping one of these guys,

Make sure you have at least a 20-gallon tank or larger. This fish will eat snails, but it also feeds on algae and worms, as well as crustaceans like shrimp and crayfish.

The Green Spotted Puffer is a very active fish that will need plenty of swimming room. They are also territorial and will fight with other species if kept together, so make sure you have enough space for each fish.

The Green Spotted Puffer is a beautiful fish with bright green spots and black outlines. They are very hardy and can live for 15 years or more if cared for properly. This species does best in cooler water, around 70°F, so make sure you have a tank heater if necessary.

The Green Spotted Puffer is a freshwater fish that can be kept in an aquarium and is a good choice for beginners. The species does best when kept with other fish in large groups.

So if you plan on keeping one of these guys, make sure you have at least a 20-gallon tank or larger. This fish will eat snails, but it also feeds on algae and worms, as well as crustaceans like shrimp and crayfish.

11. Betta Fish

Betta fish are carnivorous, meaning they consume meat as their main food source. They would eat most snails and some shrimp, crickets, and worms. However, you should avoid feeding your betta fish a lot of snails because it can make them sick.

Betta fish require a lot of space because their large fins take up a lot of space in the tank and their bodies grow quickly.

Betta fish are also aggressive, so you will need to keep an eye on the other inhabitants of your aquarium to make sure that no one gets hurt during feeding time or when fighting over territory.

Also note that Bettas require lots of oxygen, so make sure to add decorations like plants or rocks that are at least twice as tall as the water level in your tank so they can breathe easier!

Bettas are easy to care for because they do not require a lot of work. You will need to clean their tank once every two weeks and make sure there is plenty of oxygen in the water.

You may also want to add some fish food to the tank once every two or three days just so your betta has something to eat!

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12. Assassin Snail

Assassin snails are a good choice for aquariums with fish that eat snails. They are very effective at hunting down and eating other snails, but they must be kept in groups of at least three or four in order to stay out of harm’s way.

If you want your assassin snail to be safe from predators, it is important that your tank has plenty of hiding places for them to retreat into when they feel threatened.

This can make it challenging to house these creatures if you have a small tank or shrimp population because there may not be enough space for all the necessary hiding spaces needed by the assassin snail.

If you are considering buying a fish or shrimp tank, it is important to first consider whether you will be able to house a snail. Snails can be great additions to your aquarium if you have enough space for them and the right setup for them.

If you do not have enough space or if your tank is already full of fish and shrimp, this may not be the best choice for you.

Final verdict

If you’re looking for a fish that will eat your annoying little snails, these are some of the best options. They can help keep your tank clean, and they don’t require much maintenance either!

If you’re thinking of adding snails to your aquarium, be sure to do your homework. You’ll do both your fish and your snails a disservice if you don’t learn as much as you can about their ideal environment. Also, make sure you understand which fish eat snails!

There are a few more points to consider before making your final decision. Your choice must be endorsed by the employee of your fish store, so don’t hesitate to ask questions before purchasing the fish.

Some snails may not be compatible with the fish you have at home. There is also a matter of compatibility between the different types of snails, so be sure to get what is needed for your habitat.

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